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FIND YOUR DREAM HOME OR APARTMENT

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Mar 26, 2014 3:51PM
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This is the best advice. We remodeled our bathroom two years ago. I was one that was not patient and tore my bathroom up before I had everything I needed. I was just so anxious, but you are right about it being better to wait. We only had one bathroom for quite sometime, which was frustrating when we had guests. www.gwalkerconstruction.com 
Feb 1, 2014 1:35PM
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I've had several contractors in to give me prices for a shower replacement. I almost laughed out loud at them. $4-5K for a job that has less then $1,000 in materials and took me when I did it 5 days. You know something's wrong when they show up in a $50,000+ truck that's detailed and spotless. I don't mind paying fair wages, but don't try to rip me off!
Jan 26, 2013 2:54PM
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"An outhouse for the priveleged few".  Excuse me but I haven't actually seen an outhouse

since I was 2 years old and we were visitting my old grandparents back in "Coal Country"!!!

That was 48 years ago...You've come a long way baby.

Jan 26, 2013 10:00AM
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Too much spent on an outhouse for the privileged few.  Too much spent without prior approval.  Too much hypocrisy about our deficit while an outrage like this is permitted.
Jan 26, 2013 9:48AM
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Although a curved shower rod sounds like a good idea, how do you "cover" it when it starts to rust.  Every single shower rod I've ever bought rust horribly in a rather short time.  I have found plastic rod covers to fix the problem so the rod always looks like new, but you won't find one to fit a curved rod and since I've never found a stainless steel shower rod, good luck with that!
Jan 26, 2013 9:16AM
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I would have liked to really see this $180 shower curtain that every one comments on....
Jan 26, 2013 7:01AM
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I would just like to point out the golden wood door frame looks terrible with dark wood vanity. Probably should have gone with tip #1 is use an interior decorator.

It looks like the original bathroom was all golden.

And who has/ leaves popcorn ceiling in a bathroom?

Jan 26, 2013 6:58AM
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I know some people who deal antiques. When they were remodeling their bathroom, they had an antque buffet that they had come by for practically nothing - although the cabinitry (two doors in the middle and 3 drawers on each side) was in pretty good shape, the top was ruined and one of the legs was badly chipped. Rather than use it for firewood, they decided to turn it into their new bathroom vanity by removing the legs (which made it just the right height), installing a nice oval sink in the top, and poly-coating the rest. The result was a beautiful antique-looking bathroom vanity with an easy-to-clean surface.
Jan 26, 2013 6:07AM
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Actually , bath remodels are individual and to classify under one category such as don't move plumbing is a mistake. A lot of remodelers don't like to use licensed craftsmen (plumbers, electricians) because they associate that with higher costs. Completing the job right keeps you from tearing out the beautiful work after the remodel is complete. I rarely wait longer than 1 week for a custom built vanity and it's usually only a couple of hundred higher(custom finished)  than a cheap big box model.

Jan 26, 2013 6:04AM
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With an older bathroom, it just makes sense to do a complete gut, including the drywall.  Don't try to re-use any of the old stuff.  It may be 20 years or more before the bathroom is re-done again.  Buy the best fixtures you can afford.  Install a new tub, sink, and low-water-flush toilet, light fixtures, and flooring.  Install a dimmer switch on the lighting circuit.  Inset the medicine cabinet into the six-inch plumbing wall if possible.  Insulate all the walls for noise supression, especially if the bathroom abuts a "public" room of the house.  This will help reduce transmitted bathroom noises as well as plumbing noises.  I like a shower door rather than a curtain.  As much as I like tile in a shower, I prefer a seamless material.  Tile grout always seems to eventually leak or discolor, and needs occasional re-grouting.  Plus, it's easier to clean a smooth, seamless material.  Just my opionions from my experience.  I'm sure some will disagree.
Jan 26, 2013 5:41AM
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My advice to people doing a bathroom remodel:

1. Don't plan to relocate plumbing unless absolutely necessary. The time, cost, and hassle of relocating plumbing lines in your home is usually not worth it. Not only that, relocating plumbing will often involve tearing up some other part of your house to access plumbing lines, especially if the bathroom is on an upper floor. Even if you are unhappy with the location of a fixture consider some more creative options. For example, if you hate the location of your sink and vanity maybe it would work to place a small wall mounted or vessel sink in the original plumbing location and placing a larger vanity with no sink in another location that works better for layout of the bath. Then have the contractor do two quotes so you can compare cost, time, and construction involved before you make the decision.  

2. Stick with the classics for the big cost items. You may love a trendy new bath you saw in a magazine but consider when you plan to remodel your bathroom next. If you are the type of person that can afford to remodel every 5 years then go for it. But if you plan to keep this remodel for more than a few years, stick with fixtures and flooring that are more neutral to different design schemes. If you want a more trendy look, choose wall finishes and accessories (like the shower curtain the writer spoke of) that fit the style you like. That way, when the trends change is a few years, you can make some basic changes and still have a bath that doesn't look outdated.

3. Consider your lifestyle. Once again, you may have fallen in love with a look you saw in a showroom but remember that these are not being used in real life. Although a high finish vessel sink may look awesome in the showroom, if you have two kids brushing their teeth there every day, it probably will not look very nice unless you plan to polish it every day. And if you have a teen girl who uses the bathroom to do makeup, hair, and nails along with all the products and accessories involved planning a minimalist bath with no storage is not practical. Look at the problem areas in your current bath and try to resolve them in your remodel. Its not just about looks, you want your bath to be functional for your lifestyle.

Jan 26, 2013 5:38AM
Jan 26, 2013 4:20AM
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