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Apr 20, 2012 3:50PM
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Except for pointing out that having your plans approved is different than meeting code; this does not teach anything new to a potential builder. Read popular mechanics if  you want less sissy tips. 
Apr 20, 2012 3:31PM
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Man, these are reall dumb mistakes.  I'm sorry to sound harsh, but these seem to be more about common sense than any type of building experience.
Apr 20, 2012 2:14PM
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Dude, you know these are all things a woman would do. No man would ever make a mistake like that. Women should only build cakes and meatloaf in the kitchen, leave the real building to us men.
Jan 20, 2012 5:42PM
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what does cruising for dates have anything to do with this article?
Jan 20, 2012 1:02PM
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If you create a platform to work from in the attic, do one of two things:  1) Temporarily screw it in place; or 2) make sure the plywood is cut so that both ends are setting of a rafter.  If not secured you may find yourself up-ended and dropping  through the ceiling to the floor below.
Aug 13, 2011 3:07AM
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To the fellow using a 3 in. DWS to hang a picture: “Stupid is as stupid does.”

 

As a licensed, independent, building inspector, a word of advise: Don’t rely on Code Enforcement inspectors  as the pinnacle of building knowledge. Do your own homework. For building projects, consult the IBC (International Building Code), for plumbing the IPC (International Plumbing Code) and for electrical, the NEC (National Electrical Code). These are all tough reading, but it’s worth it. Then and only then should you ask the local code enforcement for any additional requirements for your specific local. Have them write you up a list, on official stationary, then have them sign it. Then there’s no questions asked.

 

To Gary Kilinger: A friend did the same thing. He’s German so he’s not used to seeing anything other than “I” or “O” on switches. Suffice-it-to-say, when he plugged it in, it took off and flew across the living room and blew right through the dining room doors before it ran out of cord. I laughed so hard I thought I was going to wet myself.

 

To Ronzy: Try using Aguila .22 Super Colibri instead of a .25. In a bolt action rifle, they’re virtually silent and will do the trick up to about 50 ft.  Smile

Apr 11, 2011 10:28AM
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A 25 caliber shot to the back of the head works on woodchucks once they're in the trap. Just don't make the mistake of thinking that a 30 caliber carbine round isn't all that much bigger. Believe me, there is a huge difference.
Apr 11, 2011 7:55AM
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Just a few comments, in regards to the horizontal spindles, if that is on the plans that were approved by the building official, you can get them to fix it for you.  Also, if doing a project yourself and it fails an inspection, always ask for the code section that applies.  Some inspectors actually make up their own rules along with the code and most homeowners won't know the difference.  Most inspectors are more than willing to help if you have questions so if you have any questions before you start, make sure they are answered.  Questions could be how close the spindles need to be or how high can the railing go, ask before and they will be glad to answer.  Just be patient with them.  Some inspectors inspect up to 20 townships and cannot always be reached by phone but will usually call you within a day of a message.  With any DIY project, just remember it is a good practice to first call the local jurisdiction and see if a permit is needed and answer any questions.  Like one slide said, always schedule more time, if you rush a project, you will most likely make mistakes.  Unless it is an emergency project (roof leaks and thunderstorms on the way) take some time and do your homework.  Even if the project is on hold because of money issues, still do all the homework so you can be ready when you finally choose to start.
Apr 11, 2011 5:46AM
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Very good tips. On slide #4 about the drum sander, I laughed until I cried. What a visual image it created.
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